Local History

After more than 40 years away, Marblehead fire truck comes home
Local History, Municipal Matters, Public safety, Top Stories

After more than 40 years away, Marblehead fire truck comes home

Nearly everyone has a vehicle they dream about owning. Maybe it's a sports car, luxury vehicle, decked-out Harley or even a fire truck. "Every firefighter, I think, dreams of owning their own fire truck," said Marblehead Fire Chief Jason Gilliland. Jason Gilliland, Marblehead Fire Chief, poses with his newly acquired 1939 Mack model 80 Fire Truck. The former Marblehead Fire Truck came from Sunapee, New Hampshire Fire Department. Gilliland says he can’t wait to drive it in the town parades. Photo by Nicole Goodhue Boyd And for Gilliland, that dream has come true. Gilliland recently became the proud owner of a classic 1939 model 80 Mack combination pumper/ladder truck. If that weren't exciting enough, it is an original Marblehead fire truck. Gilliland said he'd looked off a...
The Dixey Collection
Local History, Local News

The Dixey Collection

The Marblehead Current is proud to partner with photographer Dan Dixey, who regularly shares photos of Marblehead from his extensive collection, along with information about each shot. “This photograph was taken after a winter storm in 1969 by the late Dave Moynihan,” explained Dan Dixey, who has collected more than 5,000 historic photos of Marblehead. “A John S. Martin truck is driving down Pleasant Street near the former Dill’s Restaurant and Marblehead Submarine Shop.”
Banner year for the Glover’s Regiment march
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Banner year for the Glover’s Regiment march

It was a chilly and clear night for Glover’s Marblehead Regiment’s annual march from the Old Town House to Old Burial Hill to pay homage to Gen. John Glover.  As the sun retreated, Capt. Seamus Daly led the march as a banner-year crowd of about 150 people trailed behind the single-file line of reenactors.   Members of Glover’s Marblehead Regiment tell the story of how the famous Marblehead general helped George Washington cross the Delaware River in the Revolutionary War. : Locals join Revolutionary War reenactors as they march in the annual funeral procession from the Old Town House to the former home of General John Glover on Sat., Jan. 29. Reenactors prepare to march outside Gen. John Glover’s former home during the Glover’s Marblehead Regiment funeral march...
The Dixey Collection: Meet the keeper of 5,000 Marblehead photographs
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The Dixey Collection: Meet the keeper of 5,000 Marblehead photographs

The Marblehead Current is proud to partner with photographer Dan Dixey, who will be sharing photos from his extensive collection, along with information about each shot, in our print and online editions. “Each picture is a frozen moment.” So says Dan Dixey, who has collected more than 5,000 photographs of Marblehead dating back to the 1860s and chronicling life here in town. Photographer Dan Dixey has collected more than 5,000 pictures of Marblehead. COURTESY PHTO / MELISSA DIXEY “Each picture makes me wonder what else was going on around it and how my family was a part of what was going on,” Dixey told the Marblehead Current. Dixey is an 11th-generation Marbleheader. “William Dixey sailed over on one of the first English ships and settled in Salem in 1629, when Salem en...
Marblehead time capsule: Mutiny on the Hannah
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Marblehead time capsule: Mutiny on the Hannah

I am sure everybody has heard of the mutiny on the H.M.S. Bounty. Capt. Nicholson Broughton's home at 5 Lee St. COURTESY PHOTO Whether you read about it in school or saw the Anthony Hopkins film, it was an exciting tale about life at sea in the 18th century. For those not familiar with it, here is a brief history of the events: In April of 1789, Fletcher Christian, the master’s mate on the H.M.S. Bounty, led a successful mutiny against Lt. Bligh. Bligh was an oppressive commander and insulted those under him. On April 28, near the island of Tonga, Fletcher Christian and his fellow mutineers took the ship by force. Bligh and 18 of his loyal crew were set adrift in a small boat with food, water, and a sextant. To the amazement of many, Lt. Bligh and his men safely reached ...
Glover’s Regiment commemorates Delaware River crossing 
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Glover’s Regiment commemorates Delaware River crossing 

With a volley salute at the State Street landing on Friday night, Dec. 30, Glover’s Marblehead Regiment commemorated a turning point in the American Revolutionary War. Gen. George Washington’s crossing of the Delaware River allowed the Continental Army to launch a sneak attack against Hessian soldiers and secure its first major victory in 1776. Marblehead’s Gen. John Glover and his men, many also from town, were instrumental in carrying out the mission. Glover's Marblehead Regiment fire a vollet salute.COURTESY PHOTO / BRUCE DURKEE The National Park Service writes of Glover’s leadership and the historic moment: “Following the American retreat across New Jersey, Glover rejoined Washington’s forces on the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River in early December. There, 10 miles belo...
It’s a wonderful (mini) Marblehead!
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It’s a wonderful (mini) Marblehead!

Chicki Curtis stands next to her mini Marblehead village depicting the town during winter. COURTESY PHOTOS / SHARON DOLIBER ...And then there was another one and another one and another one.  The Old Town House as depicted in Chicki Curtis’ miniature Marblehead village.  That’s how Marblehead resident Chicki Curtis, in part, tells the story behind her sprawling miniature replica of Marblehead, depicting the town blanketed in white powder during the holiday season. The mini village, now on display in the Gerry 5, features several local landmarks and hundreds of little pieces - trees, animals, children, cars - to capture Marblehead at the turn of the 20th century.  “We lost several pieces the last couple of years somehow, but if you count everything there is...
Marblehead public meetings, week of Dec. 19 – 23, 2022
Local History, Municipal Matters

Marblehead public meetings, week of Dec. 19 – 23, 2022

Monday, Dec. 19 4 p.m., Marblehead Light Board Meeting. Attend in person at 80 Commercial Street or virtually HERE. municipal_light_board_agenda_12-19-2022Download Tuesday, Dec. 20 10 a.m., Marblehead Board of Assessors. Attend in person in the Mary Alley Building, 7 Widger Road. board_of_assessors_agenda_12-20-2022Download 7 p.m., Old and Historic Districts Commission Meeting Wednesday, Dec. 21 2 p.m., Marblehead Select Board. Attend in person in the Select Board Meeting Room, Abbot Hall, 188 Washington St., or virtually HERE.
MARBLEHEAD MEMORIES: The women of Fort Sewall
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MARBLEHEAD MEMORIES: The women of Fort Sewall

To begin, did you know that two Marblehead women were given the responsibility of looking after Fort Sewall in the 19th century? But first, a little history: The property now called Fort Sewall was originally known to 17th century Marbleheaders as Mavericks Head. Named for Marblehead resident Moses Maverick who originally owned the oceanside property. . An 1860 watercolor painting of Fort Sewall depicting where the commander’s quarters once stood. COURTESY PHOTO / MARBLEHEAD MUSEUM The original earthwork fort was built in 1644 and equipped with cannons to protect the town from possible attacks by the Dutch and the French. By the 1670’s, the land on which the fort was built became known as Gales Head. Named for it ‘s next owner, Ambrose Gale. In the 1790’s, the U.S. Gove...
MARBLEHEAD CHRONICLES: Early fishing and early settlement
Local History, Opinion, Top Stories

MARBLEHEAD CHRONICLES: Early fishing and early settlement

King James I of England. English investors were anxious to attract new settlers to Marblehead. Capt. John Smith wrote of the advantages of fishing as a trade, and King James piously added, ‘In truth, ‘tis an honest trade, t’was the apostles own calling.’ Religious freedom and self-government were admirable reasons to come to the New World, but it was commerce that really fueled the early settlement of Marblehead. Fishing was the first and most enduring of the trades that provided income for the colonies. Many early settlers were sponsored and funded by investors who made money on the sale of dried fish. To encourage immigration, advertising claims told of such abundance that men could walk across Marblehead Harbor on the backs of fish without ever getting their feet wet. Marbleh...